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What is Zinc? 

Zinc is an essential mineral which:

  • Maintain structural integrity of proteins
  • Regulate gene expression (DNA)
  • Major component in many enzymes including alcohol processing enzymes
  • Supports growth and development during pregnancy, childhood and adolescence
  • Important component in wound healing and skin health
  • Essential for immune function, thyroid function
  • Used in senses of taste and smell

Diseases commonly caused by low zinc may include: hair loss, diarrhoea, delayed sexual development, loss of appetite, immune insufficiency, poor wound healing 

RDI

Age

Male

Recommended intake

Female

Recommended intake

Pregnancy (P) + Lactation (L)

0-6m

2mg (adequate intake)

2mg (adequate intake)

 

7-12m

3mg

3mg

 

1-3yr

3mg

3mg

 

4-8yr

4mg

4mg

 

9-13yr

6mg

6mg

 

14-18yr

13mg

7mg

10mg (P)

11mg (L)

19+ yr

14mg

8mg

11mg (P)

12mg (L)

Sources of Zinc (vegetarian)

  • Pumpkin seeds roasted, 30g = 2.2mg
  • Shiitake mushrooms, 1 cup cooked = 2mg
  • Lentils, 1 cup cooked = 2.5mg
  • Chickpeas, 100g = 1.5mg
  • Cheddar cheese, 45g = 1.5mg
  • Oats (rolled), 1 cup = 1.5mg
  • Peanuts, 30g = 0.8mg
  • Egg, 1 egg = 0.6mg

Sources of Zinc (non-vegetarian)  

Main sources from meat/fish/poultry 

  • Oysters, 85g = 32mg
  • Beef sirloin, 85g = 3.8mg
  • Crab, 85g = 3.2mg
  • Sardines (canned), 85g = 1.1mg

Meal options 

Please refer to That Clean Life document – link required 

Fun Facts

  • Zinc and iron compete for absorption, so separate your supplements if taking both
  • High doses of zinc may cause copper deficiency
  • 85% zinc is found in skeletal muscle and bone
  • Zinc is best taken after a meal, as you may feel nauseas when taking on an empty stomachs